Bullying


Are you a bully?

The signs…Do you tease people push people around or pick on them on a regular basis? Or do you hang out with a group of people that do? Is it possible that someone has felt bullied by you or your friends?

Bullying ruins people’s lives. Every year around 16 children in the UK kill themselves after being bullied. Others miss out on education because they can’t concentrate or they bunk off to keep away from the bullies. Even for those who survive bullying, the effects on their self-esteem, confidence and relationships with others can last for years.

You may feel like it’s just a joke but it is very serious and harmful, no one deserves to be treated like that and it needs to stop.

How to stop

  • Look at yourself why do you do it, Has someone done it to you? Are you worried that people will do it to you? Do you have low self esteem and it makes you feel more important to make others feel low?

People can change and you can choose what kind of person you want to be. You will like yourself more and feel more positive if you deal with this stuff properly instead of taking it out on other people.

What do I do if I see someone else being bullied?

Watching and doing nothing while someone gets bullied is helping the bullies. Have the courage to speak out and get help if you see it happening.

Am I being bullied?Bullying takes many forms, from repetitive name-calling, hitting, spreading rumours, stealing, excluding people and turning someone’s friends against them. It can be subtle or very obvious and violent. You can also be bullied via abusive telephone calls text messages or online.

I think it is my fault.

NO IT IS NOT! Although it’s hard to feel sorry for bullies, it might help to understand that happy people do not need to bully. It’s the bullies who have a problem, not the people they pick on.

 



What should I do?

  • Speak out!  No one ever has the right to treat you like that.

Tell someone you can trust and who is in a position to help (not make things worse) It’s probably not a good idea to tell someone who is likely to ‘get them back’ as that will cause even more problems for you in the long run. Consider a teacher parent, Mentor family friend or older pupil in the school. Sometimes just having things out in the open can be enough to make bullies stop. (Your school should have an anti-bullying policy). If you can’t tell your teachers, ask a parent or another adult to speak to them for you.

  • Keep a diary of what happens,

Write when and where. Stick to the facts and try not to miss out anything important. This will help you get a better picture of what is happening and of what you may need to do. (There may be things you can do yourself to avoid the situations) It will also give you a clear run down of events and help show you’re telling the truth when you go for support.

  • If you’re being bullied on your phone,

Save all messages, if you have space. If not, write down the time of the call/text, what was said and the sender’s number if you have it. DO NOT reply to any texts or pick up the phone – it’s just what the bully wants.

  • If you’re being bullied in a chat room,

DO NOT respond to what they write, Instead name them as a bully to everyone else in the chat room so other users can support you.  Email the moderators or hosts to complain, using examples from the chat room. If there are no moderators, then do not use the chat room any more. Good chat rooms are moderated.

If you are struggling with Bullying and you don’t know who to talk to a bullying website may help or the Child Line website. You could also call Child Line or the Samaritans without having to give your name. Child Line on 0800 1111 (free) or The Samaritans on 08457 90 90 90 (cost of a local call) 24/7